Memory Loss

Summer Vacation: Traveling with a Loved One with Dementia

Senior traveling with caregiver

Traveling during the summer months is a time-honored tradition that many of us look forward to every year. If you’re a caregiver to a loved one with dementia, you may be wondering if summer travel is even in the cards anymore. The answer is a resounding yes, according to Sue Sunderland, Executive Director of The Bridges at Warwick.

Parenting the Parent: When Adult Children Care for Their Aging Parent

Senior with his adult child son

The first time you notice that something’s a little off with your parent can come as a shock. Maybe Mom suddenly becomes rude when you ask her if she needs help doing something. Or Dad refuses to discuss finances with you when you ask a polite, passing question. You may even brush it off, chalking it up to old age. But then, if that off-ness progresses to big red flags, like not remembering that they spoke to you yesterday, or they forget the directions to the store they visit every week, it starts to become more of a worry. 

The Prevalence of Dementia Diagnoses in Seniors

Senior and Adult Child Laughing and Talking Together

We are entering an unprecedented time in American history. The Baby Boomers are aging and, thanks to the advances made in science and medicine, are expected to live longer than the generations before them. While education and preventative care mean that the aging population has a better chance of living healthier, fuller and more productive lives, it also means that we can expect to see an increase in the number of individuals developing dementia.

Traveling During the Holidays with a Loved One with Memory Loss

Traveling During the Holidays with a Loved One with Memory Loss

As the holiday season approaches, our thoughts often turn to visiting friends and family. Whether it’s a short trip across town or a cross-country trip by plane, visiting loved ones makes the holidays merry and bright. But if you’re a caregiver for someone with dementia or another form of memory loss, travel requires more than a little preparation, patience and determination. 

The Health Benefit of Physical Therapy for an Aging Adult with Memory Loss

The Health Benefit of Physical Therapy for an Aging Adult with Memory Loss

Exercise has been proven to be beneficial for people of all ages. That goes double for individuals living with Alzheimer’s disease, dementia or another form of memory loss. They not only receive the numerous physical benefits, but also see improvement in motor skills, a decreased risk of falls and a lower rate of diseases that are associated with cognitive decline. This results in improved memory and behavior, better communication abilities and a variety of other benefits specifically related to the unique challenges of those with dementias.

Is It Time to Make the Move into a Secure Memory Care Neighborhood?

If you’re a caregiver for a loved one with dementia, you’ve been dutiful about watching them and adjusting their care to meet his or her needs. However, there may come a time when you notice that Mom or Dad is declining in health and ability. They may be more difficult to handle, or issues are popping up that you don’t always feel comfortable handling yourself. You’re spending more and more of your time taking care of them (and becoming more and more stressed out). Sound familiar?

The Vista Memory Care Program: Why It’s so Special

The Ethics Behind Therapeutic Fibbing

The Ethics Behind Therapeutic Fibbing

From a young age, parents tell their children to tell the truth and always be honest, often modeling these behaviors and reprimanding them for lying. As we age, however, what becomes acceptable tends to change, within reason. This can include little white lies and fibs, so long as they don’t directly harm or impact someone else negatively. In the world of caring for a loved one with dementia, white lies and fibbing may come up again through the use of therapeutic fibbing and validation therapy.

Coordinating Care for an Aging Parent With Your Siblings

5 Strategies for Caregivers to Minimize Sundowning Symptoms

Woman Caregiving Sundowning Senior

Are you serving as a caregiver to a loved one with memory loss? If so, it’s likely you face a range of challenges on a daily basis. As their memory loss progresses, you may begin to notice symptoms and health issues that you didn’t before. If you notice the senior in your care is starting to become restless, irritable, agitated or confused late in the evening or as daylight fades, they may be experiencing sundowning.

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