Memory Care

Understanding Sundowning: The Late-Day Behaviors That Keep Your Loved One Up at Night

As Alzheimer’s disease progresses, the cognitive changes in the brain cause behaviors that no longer follow ordinary cues for daily activities. Unfortunately, sleep is not excluded. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, about 20 percent of those with the disease suffer from sundowning, a condition that occurs in the mid to late stages of Alzheimer’s and manifests in increased agitation, anxiety or confusion late in the day, making it difficult to relax enough to go to sleep. 

Coping with Life’s Changing Dynamics: Expert Tips on Caring for a Spouse

“As more Americans live longer today, an increasing number of couples are faced with dealing with a spouse who needs additional care and support,” says Sue Sunderland, Executive Director at soon-to-open The Bridges at Warwick in Jamison, Pa. “And while the health issues of a loved one can impact the entire family, it is typically the person’s spouse whose life is affected the most.

“Experts in family dynamics explain that in these situations, the spouse’s life can change dramatically, especially in terms of quality of life.”

Caregiving Tips on Humor for Caregivers and Their Loved Ones with Memory Loss

Is Laughter the Best Medicine for You and Your Loved One with Memory Loss?

Sue Sunderland, Executive Director at soon to open The Bridges at Warwick in Jamison, Pa., says, “While there is certainly nothing funny about the progressive effects of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia — especially if you are caring for a loved one with memory loss – humor is now actually considered a useful form of therapy.

“Today, memory care experts and researchers agree that humor can provide tangible physical and emotional benefits to both caregivers and their loved ones with memory loss.

Tips for Selecting Meaningful Activities for Your Loved One with Memory Loss

Engaging Your Loved One Through Everyday Activities

“A person living with Alzheimer's disease or other forms of dementia doesn't have to give up the activities that he or she has always loved. Many of these activities can be modified to your loved one’s current ability and phase of memory loss. In addition to enhancing quality of life, engaging everyday activities can reduce behaviors such as anxiety, agitation, apathy, depression and wandering,” says Sue Sunderland, Executive Director at The Bridges at Warwick in Jamison, PA.

Tips for Coping with Sensory Loss in Your Loved One with Dementia

Sensory Changes and Dementia: Keeping Your Loved One Safe and Connected

Sue Sunderland, Executive Director at soon-to-open senior living community, The Bridges at Warwick in Jamison, Pa., says, “Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia are progressive in nature. Therefore, over time, they will increasingly affect brain cells and cause changes to a person’s basic functional abilities.

The Value of Reminiscing with Your Loved One with Memory Loss

Why Reminiscing with Your Loved One with Memory Loss is so Valuable

Sue Sunderland, Executive Director at the soon-to-open senior living community, The Bridges at Warwick in Jamison, Pa., says, “Here, we believe very strongly in the power of positive relationships for loved ones living with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. As a result, we offer countless ways for our residents to connect with one another, their families and our team members.

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